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There is so much being written about establishing a native garden. In some areas of the country, new developments are being landscaped using only native plants. Here is an article by Annie White , a research assistant, from The University of Vermont. It explains very well the benefits of having native plants.

A native plant, by definition, has existed for thousands of years in a particular region. Without the help of gardeners with watering cans, bags of fertilizer, and bales of straw mulch, these plants naturally adapted to the conditions around them.  A plant that is native to a particular region is naturally more tolerant of the local climate, rainfall trends, soils, insects, and diseases. These attributes can contribute to a lower-maintenance, longer-lasting, and environmentally friendly garden.  Here are five reasons why native plants will like your garden as much as you like them. Read More→

Feb
01

All About Anthuriums

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The are two groups of Anthurium grown in greenhouses. The only ones you’re likely to see in the garden center are the flowering varieties with their multicolored spathes and red or yellow tail-like flower spikes. They will flower any time of the year, provided they are healthy.

You might also come across a few of the large-leaved, deeply veined foliage types.

Foliage Anthuriums are mostly found at specialty greenhouses or through online nurseries. To grow them, it’s best to replicate conditions found in tropical zones. Keep them in very high humidity and warmth, and provide a climbing support if necessary. Read More→

by Joelle Steele

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Indoor plants are proven to have generally a great effect on our psyche and morale as well as our physical health!

As we all know plants are natural filters who transform carbon dioxide into oxygen but on top of this extremely important role they normally perform for us, plants also seem to be “natural filters” that remove many other toxins from the air increasing air quality, especially in indoor environments, ultimately improving our health!

In office environments in particular, plants do a whole lot more! They decrease stress while enhancing productivity (studies show by 12%!); they lower operations and maintenance costs of office buildings; they improve employees’ state of mind, reducing stress and improving employees’ work-life experience; they improve the overall aesthetics of an office environment; and, last but not least, they reduce office distractions by reducing noise. Read More→

by Liz

I grew up in a home where my parents enhanced our interior living spaces by bringing in the vibrancy of our outdoor gardens. My father had built a rock bed in our family room to have the cluster of potted plants sit in (although I think it was also meant for catching the bird droppings from our caged finches). I wish I had an image to share, I don’t recall the names of the plants, I just remember tree-like plants, cacti, and seasonal flowering plants and perhaps a fern or two or maybe it was a spider plant that made me feel – even in the dead of a Rochester, NY winter – the life, color and warmth that these plants provided.

When I moved to my first apartment with my husband, we incorporated all of his plants that he had collected from his places of residence, including some from his parents home. I do remember that we had many spider plants, they were indestructible! Once we acquired our first cat that decided the dirt in the base of the planters would make a perfect liter box, we removed live plants from our living environments. We didn’t have plants until we owned a home – and those were outside in the gardens! (We still do not have any interior plants, only the occasional vase of flowers on the table) Currently, between the design of our home and the lack of direct sunshine on the first floor and the additional two cats and dog – we maintain exterior garden beds for our flowering plants, shrubs and enjoy the sugar maple trees that line our property. Read More→

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by Joelle Steele

Ferns, botanically known as Filices, are native to all parts of the world, but are most often found in the tropics and subtropical areas. Some are epiphytic in nature while others make their homes on the shaded floors of tropical wood forests.

Many interiorscapers dismiss ferns as being too messy and therefore too hard to maintain. But, while some of the messiness seems characteristic of certain species, it can be reduced by proper care, and, there are alternative species which are more exotic and less problematic.

Here are some common indoor ferns: Acrostichum aureum (“Leather fern”); Asplenium (“Birdsnest ferns and Mother ferns”); Cyrtomium falcatum (“Holly and Fishtail ferns”); Nephrolepis exaltata (“Bostons, Lace, Feather, and Sword ferns”); Pellaea rotundifolia (“Button fern”); Platycerium (“Staghorn and Elkhorn ferns”); Polypodium aureum (“Hare’s foot and Crisped blue ferns”); and Stenochlaena (“Liane fern”). Read More→

By Nick Easen for CNN

Putting plants in the workplace could be one way to celebrate Earth Day, but research shows that it may also promote staff well being.

If your job makes you feel dreary, it could be time to introduce vegetation to your personal breathing zone — an area of six to eight cubic feet (0.2 cubic meters) — where we spend most of our working day.

Office plants have become more popular over the last 30 years, with research reinforcing the belief that they improve the atmosphere, reduce stress, and sharpen concentration. Read More→

By Randolph Craig

Interior plants and modern architectural designs go hand-in-hand. The people who do the internal decoration of buildings understand that all rooms are improved when healthy, natural vegetation, is present, whether flowers or leaves. The atmosphere in these areas becomes alive, rather than sterile and unwelcoming.

They may be placed in pots that are positioned to break a hard, uncompromising line in the architecture. Their presence adds warmth, creating an ambiance that is synchronized with the nature around them. They grow and change, making people get a sense of life from their surrounds and even become more aware of their natural environment. Read More→

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