Archive for Houseplants

Feb
01

All About Anthuriums

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The are two groups of Anthurium grown in greenhouses. The only ones you’re likely to see in the garden center are the flowering varieties with their multicolored spathes and red or yellow tail-like flower spikes. They will flower any time of the year, provided they are healthy.

You might also come across a few of the large-leaved, deeply veined foliage types.

Foliage Anthuriums are mostly found at specialty greenhouses or through online nurseries. To grow them, it’s best to replicate conditions found in tropical zones. Keep them in very high humidity and warmth, and provide a climbing support if necessary. Read More→

by Joelle Steele

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Indoor plants are proven to have generally a great effect on our psyche and morale as well as our physical health!

As we all know plants are natural filters who transform carbon dioxide into oxygen but on top of this extremely important role they normally perform for us, plants also seem to be “natural filters” that remove many other toxins from the air increasing air quality, especially in indoor environments, ultimately improving our health!

In office environments in particular, plants do a whole lot more! They decrease stress while enhancing productivity (studies show by 12%!); they lower operations and maintenance costs of office buildings; they improve employees’ state of mind, reducing stress and improving employees’ work-life experience; they improve the overall aesthetics of an office environment; and, last but not least, they reduce office distractions by reducing noise. Read More→

by Joelle Steele

Ferns, botanically known as Filices, are native to all parts of the world, but are most often found in the tropics and subtropical areas. Some are epiphytic in nature while others make their homes on the shaded floors of tropical wood forests.

Many interiorscapers dismiss ferns as being too messy and therefore too hard to maintain. But, while some of the messiness seems characteristic of certain species, it can be reduced by proper care, and, there are alternative species which are more exotic and less problematic.

Here are some common indoor ferns: Acrostichum aureum (“Leather fern”); Asplenium (“Birdsnest ferns and Mother ferns”); Cyrtomium falcatum (“Holly and Fishtail ferns”); Nephrolepis exaltata (“Bostons, Lace, Feather, and Sword ferns”); Pellaea rotundifolia (“Button fern”); Platycerium (“Staghorn and Elkhorn ferns”); Polypodium aureum (“Hare’s foot and Crisped blue ferns”); and Stenochlaena (“Liane fern”). Read More→

By Hazel Jennings

You might buy the newest trend in dresses or jewelry for mingling at holiday parties every winter, but local florists are keeping it classic with traditional flowers for their customers.

Lisa Keith of Bloomers Floral Studio is sticking with the demand for traditional holiday design concepts this season.  Read More→


Beginning an indoor garden requires considering the lighting requirements for each plant. Avoid scorching or drowning your indoor plants withhelp from the owner of a nursery in this free video on gardening. Expert: Frank Burkard Contact: www.burkardnurseries.com Bio: Frank Burkard, Jr., the third-generation proprietor of Burkard Nurseries, carries on the family tradition. Filmmaker: Max Cusimano Series Description: Growing vegetables can be done in a large-scale backyard garden, or in small containers on your apartment balcony. Grow your own vegetables with help from the owner of a nursery in this free video series on gardening.

Nov
10

How To Pot Orchids

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Orchids are not grown in potting soil, they’re grown in wood bark. Learn how to pot orchids in this free gardening video. Expert: Lori Young Bio: Lori Young graduated from UC Santa Cruz with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and biology. Young works in the plantscape industry. Filmmaker: Grady Johnson

Growing Expectations, Inc. PO Box 268 Princeton, NJ 08542 Telephone – (609) 924 – 9782 FAX (609) 737 – 2344