Archive for Houseplants

By Dennis Rodkin.

Establishing an indoor garden isn’t just about buying plants, it’s about first knowing what you want those plants to accomplish for you–just like outside. Local experts offered these guidelines for decorating with houseplants.

Get into shape: Because many varieties of houseplants have either insignificant blooms or none at all, it’s almost automatic to consider their form and texture. Ben Bond, general manager of Foliage Design Systems in Broadview, Ill. notes that slender, upright plants seem more suited to a formal decor, while loose or flowing plants enhance a casual feeling. Sometimes it’s a matter of try, try again, he says. The slender stalks and plumy tops of a kentia palm, for example, can look either formal and elegant or contemporary and spare, Bond says. Read More→

By Knight Ridder/Tribune.

A greenhouse is houseplant heaven where light, temperature, moisture and humidity are controlled so that plants thrive. It’s a different story once plants are purchased and transported to a house with dry, furnace-heated winter air and weak sunshine coming in a distant window. In response, leaves often turn yellow and drop, and overall plant growth stalls as it adjusts to the new conditions. To smooth the change, wrap a plant in several layers of paper when transporting it outside in winter and keep it in the heated passenger compartment of the car.

At home, make sure the plant is in a container with a drainage hole so excess water doesn’t stay trapped in the soil. Do not use softened water on houseplants. Wait to fertilize until new leaves appear. For most houseplants, that will be in late February or March. Match the plant’s light requirements to its indoor location. Houseplant labels usually indicate if the plant needs or tolerates high, moderate or low levels of light.

The highest light is in a southern exposure, followed by east and west exposures. Northern exposures provide lowest light and coolest temperatures. During winter, make sure to contact specialists from the best window company in the Cleveland area or any other to keep your place warm, also prevent houseplant foliage from touching window glass, where it can be damaged by cold temperatures.

by William Hageman,Tribune Newspapers

How many houseplantsdoes Larry Hodgson have? About 600, he says. But that’s just a guess. “My kid once tried to count them and gave up after 300,” says Hodgson, author of “Houseplants for Dummies.” “And that was only upstairs. I have lots and lots of plants downstairs and on another floor as well.”

As Hodgson points out, the benefits of houseplants are manifold. Aside from the aesthetics — a little greenery will brighten even the most squalid dump — they provide a person with physical activity and mental stimulation. They even promote a healthy environment. “Having houseplants in your home is like having your own little air filter,” he says. “In this day and age, outdoor air is generally far less polluted than indoor air because we have so many things in our homes that give off toxic products. Houseplants can clean it up for you.” Read More→

If you’re looking for plants to spice up your garden or home, consider the many fruiting varieties of tropical plants that can be germinated from seeds in fruits sold in your local supermarket.  The main advantage of germinating fruit seeds is that you may grow plants that eventually produce fruit of their own.  However, even if your plants don’t produce fruit, they will provide some variety to your home.

Many of these plants, being tropical, require a lot of heat to thrive.  If you don’t have a greenhouse, you may have to content yourself with a plant that only produces leaves and never flowers.  If you want to try your hand at serious tropical plant gardening, it’s wise to have a dedicated building to retain heat and humidity. Read More→

By Beth Botts

When you bring in houseplants from outdoors, there’s going to be culture shock. They are moving to a world of less light, bone-dry air and no beneficial insects. That’s important: Outside, predator insects curb most problem insects on houseplants by eating them for lunch.But inside our houses, it’s up to us.

Carefully inspect any plants that have returned indoors for signs of insects or insect eggs. A spray of insecticidal soap — don’t miss the undersides of the leaves — can be an effective preventive measure for bugs you can’t see. Use a soap that’s made for plants, typically sold at garden and home centers, and not a homemade concoction that might damage the leaf surface. Read More→

Indoor house plants are not only decorations. It is serving our houses as cleaners of air pollutants. Although sometimes is better to have a good air conditioner like Eastwood Air. It is also mandatory for them to stay healthy to keep on doing their roles. It’s exceedingly important to keep your indoor house plants clean. The upward thrust of dust on the leaves of the indoor house plants blocks the pores and holds back your plants from receiving needed air and light.

First plan of action is to get shot of yellow or brown dead leaves both for plants and flowers. Check the pot and remove things that have fallen off into the soil. Second is by using a wet material to wipe giant leaves from base to tip. You may use a clean paintbrush or a soft powder brush for smaller leaves. Be especially careful when holding the leaves of your indoor house plants as it can simply crack. You may use your hand to support the base of the leaves. Read More→

By Marty Ross

No matter what weather the fall and winter bring, you can keep gardening indoors. Putting together a stylish indoor garden is easier than ever. The houseplant business has grown way beyond philodendrons and Christmas cactus.

There are hip new houseplants and interesting variations on well-known themes for sale everywhere. The selection of houseplants at garden shops, big-box stores and even grocery stores hasn’t merely grown, it has matured. Cool carnivorous plants are stocked side-by-side with gorgeous moth orchids; fancy-leaf begonias are nudging out dependable but demure scheffeleras. Read More→

Colleen Smith, a writer for the Denver Flower and Gardening Examiner, wrote this article in February. I just came across it, really liked it and thought I would share it with those of you who need advice for bringing your houseplants out for the summer. I know it is already August but we still have some strong sunshine left

We’re almost to our last frost date in Denver. The date varies from roughly 5 May to 15 May, give or take a day. Springtime in the Rockies remains quite unpredictable; and here on the high plains, we dread drought and keep an eye on thermometers just in case a last blast of Old Man Winter arrives in the Mile High City. It’s been known to happen, and it’s not pretty.

Growing Expectations, Inc. PO Box 268 Princeton, NJ 08542 Telephone – (609) 924 – 9782 FAX (609) 737 – 2344