Archive for Interior Plant Design


Beginning an indoor garden requires considering the lighting requirements for each plant. Avoid scorching or drowning your indoor plants withhelp from the owner of a nursery in this free video on gardening. Expert: Frank Burkard Contact: www.burkardnurseries.com Bio: Frank Burkard, Jr., the third-generation proprietor of Burkard Nurseries, carries on the family tradition. Filmmaker: Max Cusimano Series Description: Growing vegetables can be done in a large-scale backyard garden, or in small containers on your apartment balcony. Grow your own vegetables with help from the owner of a nursery in this free video series on gardening.

By Dennis Rodkin.

Establishing an indoor garden isn’t just about buying plants, it’s about first knowing what you want those plants to accomplish for you–just like outside. Local experts offered these guidelines for decorating with houseplants.

Get into shape: Because many varieties of houseplants have either insignificant blooms or none at all, it’s almost automatic to consider their form and texture. Ben Bond, general manager of Foliage Design Systems in Broadview, Ill. notes that slender, upright plants seem more suited to a formal decor, while loose or flowing plants enhance a casual feeling. Sometimes it’s a matter of try, try again, he says. The slender stalks and plumy tops of a kentia palm, for example, can look either formal and elegant or contemporary and spare, Bond says. Read More→

By Knight Ridder/Tribune.

A greenhouse is houseplant heaven where light, temperature, moisture and humidity are controlled so that plants thrive. It’s a different story once plants are purchased and transported to a house with dry, furnace-heated winter air and weak sunshine coming in a distant window. In response, leaves often turn yellow and drop, and overall plant growth stalls as it adjusts to the new conditions. To smooth the change, wrap a plant in several layers of paper when transporting it outside in winter and keep it in the heated passenger compartment of the car.

At home, make sure the plant is in a container with a drainage hole so excess water doesn’t stay trapped in the soil. Do not use softened water on houseplants. Wait to fertilize until new leaves appear. For most houseplants, that will be in late February or March. Match the plant’s light requirements to its indoor location. Houseplant labels usually indicate if the plant needs or tolerates high, moderate or low levels of light.

The highest light is in a southern exposure, followed by east and west exposures. Northern exposures provide lowest light and coolest temperatures. During winter, make sure to contact specialists from the best window company in the Cleveland area or any other to keep your place warm, also prevent houseplant foliage from touching window glass, where it can be damaged by cold temperatures.

There is a traditional view that a few plants add much needed color to a room. It was pretty much the same view that people had of plants in the office, bringing a little taste of home to a place of work. However, office plants offer much more than just a homely feel or a little color, with research showing that there are distinct advantages to any business that chooses to invest in them.

The two most recognized benefits of indoor plants are: the improvements that they make to the environment in health terms, as well as the resulting positive psychological effects they have on occupants and the consequential drop in absenteeism. A third less recognized, but from a business standpoint perhaps the most important, is the positive impression that they can have on clients, helping to build a company image that is will lead to increased business and revenue. Just how these are accomplished is not very difficult to explain. Read More→

Hydrangeas are fascinating in that, unlike most other plants,the can change color. Many wonder how this can be, a hydrangea planted in early ed colors three times by October.Many think it is in the pH of the soil by itself but William B. Miller, a professor of horticulture at Cornell ‘t agree.Hydrangeas are fascinating in that, unlike other plants, the colors of their flowers can change dramatically. Many think that the color change is due to pH levels in the soil, but “It is not the soil pH by itself but the availability of aluminum,” said William B. Miller, a professor of horticulture at Cornell University.

Aluminum is very common in the earth’s crust, but is available to the plant only in low-pH, or acidic, soils, Dr. Miller said. The plant absorbs the aluminum through the roots.

When aluminum gets up into the sepals, the colored segments that surround the tiny hydrangea flowers, it joins two other things that make the blossom blue: a pigment called delphinidin 3-monoglucoside and a co-pigment called 3-caffeoylquinic acid.

“Both are present in both blue and pink cultivars,” Dr. Miller said. If aluminum is available, he said, the blossom is blue, and if not, it ends up pink.

“Pink cultivars can be blue, and blues can be pink,” Dr. Miller said, and some can go both ways. But white cultivars, like Sister Therese, cannot become pink or blue.

As for a multicolored plant, Dr. Miller suggested two explanations: In limey soil, a plant that started out blue may make a partial transition to pink; or near new construction, where fill soil has been brought in, some roots may be in acidic soil, while five feet away, others are exposed to aluminum ions.

Photo credit: Austin Home Improvement Blog

Oct
13

Growing Trees Indoors

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By Nara Schoenberg

My husband’s weeping fig tree (Ficus benjamina) left this world only last year, having lived 20 years with no fertilizer, ever, and far less water than it rightfully deserved. “I never watered it until I noticed it was sick,” my spouse cheerfully reported. And this isn’t simply a tale of survival. The 4-foot tree looked pretty good — and sometimes gorgeous, with a full crown of glistening leaves — for most of that time.

I was expecting a lecture and a guffaw when I ran this scenario by Barbara Pleasant, author of “The Complete Houseplant Survival Manual” (Storey, 2005), but instead I got a (restrained) pat on the back. Turns out that a select group of tall, treelike houseplants, including my husband’s unstoppable fig, can be true survivors, right up there with cockroaches, Coke Classic and Eliot Spitzer.

“Through your laissez-faire attitude, you’d given the tree exactly what it wants, which is stability,” According to the Tree Surgeon we spoke to, trees are built to stay in one place. Find a place where it’s happy and, except for rotating it for light, leave it where it is, see if it’s happy and leave it alone. Read More→

Indoor house plants are not only decorations. It is serving our houses as cleaners of air pollutants. It is also mandatory for them to stay healthy to keep on doing their roles. It’s exceedingly important to keep your indoor house plants clean. The upward thrust of dust on the leaves of the indoor house plants blocks the pores and holds back your plants from receiving needed air and light.

First plan of action is to get shot of yellow or brown dead leaves both for plants and flowers. Check the pot and remove things that have fallen off into the soil. Second is by using a wet material to wipe giant leaves from base to tip. You may use a clean paintbrush or a soft powder brush for smaller leaves. Be especially careful when holding the leaves of your indoor house plants as it can simply crack. You may use your hand to support the base of the leaves. Read More→

By Marty Ross

No matter what weather the fall and winter bring, you can keep gardening indoors. Putting together a stylish indoor garden is easier than ever. The houseplant business has grown way beyond philodendrons and Christmas cactus.

There are hip new houseplants and interesting variations on well-known themes for sale everywhere. The selection of houseplants at garden shops, big-box stores and even grocery stores hasn’t merely grown, it has matured. Cool carnivorous plants are stocked side-by-side with gorgeous moth orchids; fancy-leaf begonias are nudging out dependable but demure scheffeleras. Read More→

Growing Expectations, Inc. PO Box 268 Princeton, NJ 08542 Telephone – (609) 924 – 9782 FAX (609) 737 – 2344