Archive for Interior plants


Professor Margaret Burchett, University of Technology Sydney Australia talks about the latest research on plants removing VOCs from office environments; Robin Mellon, Green Star Executive Director, Green Building Council Australia talks about the indoor environment and how plants can improve the air quality; Ray Borg, Ambius talks about the benefits of plants in the workplace.


How to use some humidity tips for house plants; get professional tips and advice from an expert on caring for indoor plants and flowers in this free gardening video. Expert: Austin Sheppard Bio: Austin Shepard is studying Landscape Architecture at the BAC in Boston, MA. He developed an interest in landscaping and gardening while working for a landscaping company. Filmmaker: David Jackel

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By Dr. Leonard Perry
Extension Greenhouse and Nursery Crops Specialist
University of Vermont

Are you a trivia buff? If so, perhaps you’d be interested in knowing a little bit more about the poinsettia plant you buy every Christmas.

For example, did you know that the poinsettia’s main attraction is not its flowers, but its leaves? The flowers of the plant are the yellow clustered buds in the center. The colored leafy parts are actually bracts or modified leaves. Read More→


Beginning an indoor garden requires considering the lighting requirements for each plant. Avoid scorching or drowning your indoor plants withhelp from the owner of a nursery in this free video on gardening. Expert: Frank Burkard Contact: www.burkardnurseries.com Bio: Frank Burkard, Jr., the third-generation proprietor of Burkard Nurseries, carries on the family tradition. Filmmaker: Max Cusimano Series Description: Growing vegetables can be done in a large-scale backyard garden, or in small containers on your apartment balcony. Grow your own vegetables with help from the owner of a nursery in this free video series on gardening.

Nov
10

How To Pot Orchids

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Orchids are not grown in potting soil, they’re grown in wood bark. Learn how to pot orchids in this free gardening video. Expert: Lori Young Bio: Lori Young graduated from UC Santa Cruz with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and biology. Young works in the plantscape industry. Filmmaker: Grady Johnson

By Dennis Rodkin.

Establishing an indoor garden isn’t just about buying plants, it’s about first knowing what you want those plants to accomplish for you–just like outside. Local experts offered these guidelines for decorating with houseplants.

Get into shape: Because many varieties of houseplants have either insignificant blooms or none at all, it’s almost automatic to consider their form and texture. Ben Bond, general manager of Foliage Design Systems in Broadview, Ill. notes that slender, upright plants seem more suited to a formal decor, while loose or flowing plants enhance a casual feeling. Sometimes it’s a matter of try, try again, he says. The slender stalks and plumy tops of a kentia palm, for example, can look either formal and elegant or contemporary and spare, Bond says. Read More→

by William Hageman,Tribune Newspapers

How many houseplantsdoes Larry Hodgson have? About 600, he says. But that’s just a guess. “My kid once tried to count them and gave up after 300,” says Hodgson, author of “Houseplants for Dummies.” “And that was only upstairs. I have lots and lots of plants downstairs and on another floor as well.”

As Hodgson points out, the benefits of houseplants are manifold. Aside from the aesthetics — a little greenery will brighten even the most squalid dump — they provide a person with physical activity and mental stimulation. They even promote a healthy environment. “Having houseplants in your home is like having your own little air filter,” he says. “In this day and age, outdoor air is generally far less polluted than indoor air because we have so many things in our homes that give off toxic products. Houseplants can clean it up for you.” Read More→

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