Archive for Office Plants

Feb
01

All About Anthuriums

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The are two groups of Anthurium grown in greenhouses. The only ones you’re likely to see in the garden center are the flowering varieties with their multicolored spathes and red or yellow tail-like flower spikes. They will flower any time of the year, provided they are healthy.

You might also come across a few of the large-leaved, deeply veined foliage types.

Foliage Anthuriums are mostly found at specialty greenhouses or through online nurseries. To grow them, it’s best to replicate conditions found in tropical zones. Keep them in very high humidity and warmth, and provide a climbing support if necessary. Read More→

by Joelle Steele

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Indoor plants are proven to have generally a great effect on our psyche and morale as well as our physical health!

As we all know plants are natural filters who transform carbon dioxide into oxygen but on top of this extremely important role they normally perform for us, plants also seem to be “natural filters” that remove many other toxins from the air increasing air quality, especially in indoor environments, ultimately improving our health!

In office environments in particular, plants do a whole lot more! They decrease stress while enhancing productivity (studies show by 12%!); they lower operations and maintenance costs of office buildings; they improve employees’ state of mind, reducing stress and improving employees’ work-life experience; they improve the overall aesthetics of an office environment; and, last but not least, they reduce office distractions by reducing noise. Read More→

by Joelle Steele

Ferns, botanically known as Filices, are native to all parts of the world, but are most often found in the tropics and subtropical areas. Some are epiphytic in nature while others make their homes on the shaded floors of tropical wood forests.

Many interiorscapers dismiss ferns as being too messy and therefore too hard to maintain. But, while some of the messiness seems characteristic of certain species, it can be reduced by proper care, and, there are alternative species which are more exotic and less problematic.

Here are some common indoor ferns: Acrostichum aureum (“Leather fern”); Asplenium (“Birdsnest ferns and Mother ferns”); Cyrtomium falcatum (“Holly and Fishtail ferns”); Nephrolepis exaltata (“Bostons, Lace, Feather, and Sword ferns”); Pellaea rotundifolia (“Button fern”); Platycerium (“Staghorn and Elkhorn ferns”); Polypodium aureum (“Hare’s foot and Crisped blue ferns”); and Stenochlaena (“Liane fern”). Read More→

Studies were conducted in a computer lab and a small office at Washington State University to test the effects of plants on humidity and dust..  Interior plants were placed around the sides of the room for a one-week period. Relative humidity and particulate matter were monitored.

Particulate matter was measured around the rooms on various surfaces away from the plants.  Dust was significantly lower throughout both rooms when plants were present than when they were absent.  Dust was reduced by as much as 20% with plants.  This study confirmed that the use of plants to remove particulate matter, which has often been used outdoors to control deposition, also is effective on the scale present in interiors.  Read More→


Professor Margaret Burchett, University of Technology Sydney Australia talks about the latest research on plants removing VOCs from office environments; Robin Mellon, Green Star Executive Director, Green Building Council Australia talks about the indoor environment and how plants can improve the air quality; Ray Borg, Ambius talks about the benefits of plants in the workplace.

By Dr. Leonard Perry
Extension Greenhouse and Nursery Crops Specialist
University of Vermont

Are you a trivia buff? If so, perhaps you’d be interested in knowing a little bit more about the poinsettia plant you buy every Christmas.

For example, did you know that the poinsettia’s main attraction is not its flowers, but its leaves? The flowers of the plant are the yellow clustered buds in the center. The colored leafy parts are actually bracts or modified leaves. Read More→

There is a traditional view that a few plants add much needed color to a room. It was pretty much the same view that people had of plants in the office, bringing a little taste of home to a place of work. However, office plants offer much more than just a homely feel or a little color, with research showing that there are distinct advantages to any business that chooses to invest in them.

The two most recognized benefits of indoor plants are: the improvements that they make to the environment in health terms, as well as the resulting positive psychological effects they have on occupants and the consequential drop in absenteeism. A third less recognized, but from a business standpoint perhaps the most important, is the positive impression that they can have on clients, helping to build a company image that is will lead to increased business and revenue. Just how these are accomplished is not very difficult to explain. Read More→

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