Archive for Trees

There is so much being written about establishing a native garden. In some areas of the country, new developments are being landscaped using only native plants. Here is an article by Annie White , a research assistant, from The University of Vermont. It explains very well the benefits of having native plants.

A native plant, by definition, has existed for thousands of years in a particular region. Without the help of gardeners with watering cans, bags of fertilizer, and bales of straw mulch, these plants naturally adapted to the conditions around them.  A plant that is native to a particular region is naturally more tolerant of the local climate, rainfall trends, soils, insects, and diseases. These attributes can contribute to a lower-maintenance, longer-lasting, and environmentally friendly garden.  Here are five reasons why native plants will like your garden as much as you like them. Read More→

By Dr. Leonard Perry
Extension Greenhouse and Nursery Crops Specialist
University of Vermont

Are you a trivia buff? If so, perhaps you’d be interested in knowing a little bit more about the poinsettia plant you buy every Christmas.

For example, did you know that the poinsettia’s main attraction is not its flowers, but its leaves? The flowers of the plant are the yellow clustered buds in the center. The colored leafy parts are actually bracts or modified leaves. Read More→

Nov
18

Types of Christmas Trees

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People have been decorating Christmas trees for hundreds of years. Fir, pine and spruce varieties are among the most popular.

There are about 30 million Christmas trees sold in the United States every year. Most of these are conifers, or cone bearing trees with needles. Pine trees have their needles in clusters of two, three or five while the needles on fir and spruce trees are individually attached. Needles of fir trees look flat and those on spruce trees are more squared. In the southeast, Cypress trees, particularly the Leyland Cypress, is popular as a Christmas tree. Its needles are arranged in flat sprays. Read More→

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