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Feb
01

All About Anthuriums

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The are two groups of Anthurium grown in greenhouses. The only ones you’re likely to see in the garden center are the flowering varieties with their multicolored spathes and red or yellow tail-like flower spikes. They will flower any time of the year, provided they are healthy.

You might also come across a few of the large-leaved, deeply veined foliage types.

Foliage Anthuriums are mostly found at specialty greenhouses or through online nurseries. To grow them, it’s best to replicate conditions found in tropical zones. Keep them in very high humidity and warmth, and provide a climbing support if necessary. Read More→

by Liz

I grew up in a home where my parents enhanced our interior living spaces by bringing in the vibrancy of our outdoor gardens. My father had built a rock bed in our family room to have the cluster of potted plants sit in (although I think it was also meant for catching the bird droppings from our caged finches). I wish I had an image to share, I don’t recall the names of the plants, I just remember tree-like plants, cacti, and seasonal flowering plants and perhaps a fern or two or maybe it was a spider plant that made me feel – even in the dead of a Rochester, NY winter – the life, color and warmth that these plants provided.

When I moved to my first apartment with my husband, we incorporated all of his plants that he had collected from his places of residence, including some from his parents home. I do remember that we had many spider plants, they were indestructible! Once we acquired our first cat that decided the dirt in the base of the planters would make a perfect liter box, we removed live plants from our living environments. We didn’t have plants until we owned a home – and those were outside in the gardens! (We still do not have any interior plants, only the occasional vase of flowers on the table) Currently, between the design of our home and the lack of direct sunshine on the first floor and the additional two cats and dog – we maintain exterior garden beds for our flowering plants, shrubs and enjoy the sugar maple trees that line our property. Read More→

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The holiday season is upon us and it’s time once again for the annual tug-of-war over what’s appropriate – if anything – when it comes to seasonal decorations in public spaces. With half of our waking hours spent working, it’s not a surprise that many wish to liven up the daily office grind with some fun seasonal decor.

The problems generally arise when there are differing opinions on what is appropriate and whose holiday is being celebrated. In most cases, we have adopted an “all in” mentality – mixing Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa traditions, depending on the makeup of the office staff. In the best circumstances, this fosters a nice camaraderie between co-workers. In the worst, it can become a battle of personal expression vs. the rights of those who don’t celebrate the season and prefer not to deal with it for half of their waking hours. Generally, it makes sense for a company to establish a written policy based on safety issues as well as the general cultural makeup of employees and customers. Read More→

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Nov
18

Types of Christmas Trees

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People have been decorating Christmas trees for hundreds of years. Fir, pine and spruce varieties are among the most popular.

There are about 30 million Christmas trees sold in the United States every year. Most of these are conifers, or cone bearing trees with needles. Pine trees have their needles in clusters of two, three or five while the needles on fir and spruce trees are individually attached. Needles of fir trees look flat and those on spruce trees are more squared. In the southeast, Cypress trees, particularly the Leyland Cypress, is popular as a Christmas tree. Its needles are arranged in flat sprays. Read More→


Beginning an indoor garden requires considering the lighting requirements for each plant. Avoid scorching or drowning your indoor plants withhelp from the owner of a nursery in this free video on gardening. Expert: Frank Burkard Contact: www.burkardnurseries.com Bio: Frank Burkard, Jr., the third-generation proprietor of Burkard Nurseries, carries on the family tradition. Filmmaker: Max Cusimano Series Description: Growing vegetables can be done in a large-scale backyard garden, or in small containers on your apartment balcony. Grow your own vegetables with help from the owner of a nursery in this free video series on gardening.

Nov
10

How To Pot Orchids

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Orchids are not grown in potting soil, they’re grown in wood bark. Learn how to pot orchids in this free gardening video. Expert: Lori Young Bio: Lori Young graduated from UC Santa Cruz with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and biology. Young works in the plantscape industry. Filmmaker: Grady Johnson

By Dennis Rodkin.

Establishing an indoor garden isn’t just about buying plants, it’s about first knowing what you want those plants to accomplish for you–just like outside. Local experts offered these guidelines for decorating with houseplants.

Get into shape: Because many varieties of houseplants have either insignificant blooms or none at all, it’s almost automatic to consider their form and texture. Ben Bond, general manager of Foliage Design Systems in Broadview, Ill. notes that slender, upright plants seem more suited to a formal decor, while loose or flowing plants enhance a casual feeling. Sometimes it’s a matter of try, try again, he says. The slender stalks and plumy tops of a kentia palm, for example, can look either formal and elegant or contemporary and spare, Bond says. Read More→

By Knight Ridder/Tribune.

A greenhouse is houseplant heaven where light, temperature, moisture and humidity are controlled so that plants thrive. It’s a different story once plants are purchased and transported to a house with dry, furnace-heated winter air and weak sunshine coming in a distant window. In response, leaves often turn yellow and drop, and overall plant growth stalls as it adjusts to the new conditions. To smooth the change, wrap a plant in several layers of paper when transporting it outside in winter and keep it in the heated passenger compartment of the car.

At home, make sure the plant is in a container with a drainage hole so excess water doesn’t stay trapped in the soil. Do not use softened water on houseplants. Wait to fertilize until new leaves appear. For most houseplants, that will be in late February or March. Match the plant’s light requirements to its indoor location. Houseplant labels usually indicate if the plant needs or tolerates high, moderate or low levels of light.

The highest light is in a southern exposure, followed by east and west exposures. Northern exposures provide lowest light and coolest temperatures. During winter, prevent houseplant foliage from touching window glass, where it can be damaged by cold temperatures.

Growing Expectations, Inc. PO Box 268 Princeton, NJ 08542 Telephone – (609) 924 – 9782 FAX (609) 737 – 2344