Archive for Planters and Pots


Beginning an indoor garden requires considering the lighting requirements for each plant. Avoid scorching or drowning your indoor plants withhelp from the owner of a nursery in this free video on gardening. Expert: Frank Burkard Contact: www.burkardnurseries.com Bio: Frank Burkard, Jr., the third-generation proprietor of Burkard Nurseries, carries on the family tradition. Filmmaker: Max Cusimano Series Description: Growing vegetables can be done in a large-scale backyard garden, or in small containers on your apartment balcony. Grow your own vegetables with help from the owner of a nursery in this free video series on gardening.

Nov
10

How To Pot Orchids

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Orchids are not grown in potting soil, they’re grown in wood bark. Learn how to pot orchids in this free gardening video. Expert: Lori Young Bio: Lori Young graduated from UC Santa Cruz with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and biology. Young works in the plantscape industry. Filmmaker: Grady Johnson

By Dennis Rodkin.

Establishing an indoor garden isn’t just about buying plants, it’s about first knowing what you want those plants to accomplish for you–just like outside. Local experts offered these guidelines for decorating with houseplants.

Get into shape: Because many varieties of houseplants have either insignificant blooms or none at all, it’s almost automatic to consider their form and texture. Ben Bond, general manager of Foliage Design Systems in Broadview, Ill. notes that slender, upright plants seem more suited to a formal decor, while loose or flowing plants enhance a casual feeling. Sometimes it’s a matter of try, try again, he says. The slender stalks and plumy tops of a kentia palm, for example, can look either formal and elegant or contemporary and spare, Bond says. Read More→

By Knight Ridder/Tribune.

A greenhouse is houseplant heaven where light, temperature, moisture and humidity are controlled so that plants thrive. It’s a different story once plants are purchased and transported to a house with dry, furnace-heated winter air and weak sunshine coming in a distant window. In response, leaves often turn yellow and drop, and overall plant growth stalls as it adjusts to the new conditions. To smooth the change, wrap a plant in several layers of paper when transporting it outside in winter and keep it in the heated passenger compartment of the car.

At home, make sure the plant is in a container with a drainage hole so excess water doesn’t stay trapped in the soil. Do not use softened water on houseplants. Wait to fertilize until new leaves appear. For most houseplants, that will be in late February or March. Match the plant’s light requirements to its indoor location. Houseplant labels usually indicate if the plant needs or tolerates high, moderate or low levels of light.

The highest light is in a southern exposure, followed by east and west exposures. Northern exposures provide lowest light and coolest temperatures. During winter, prevent houseplant foliage from touching window glass, where it can be damaged by cold temperatures.

By Beth Botts

When you bring in houseplants from outdoors, there’s going to be culture shock. They are moving to a world of less light, bone-dry air and no beneficial insects. That’s important: Outside, predator insects curb most problem insects on houseplants by eating them for lunch.But inside our houses, it’s up to us.

Carefully inspect any plants that have returned indoors for signs of insects or insect eggs. A spray of insecticidal soap — don’t miss the undersides of the leaves — can be an effective preventive measure for bugs you can’t see. Use a soap that’s made for plants, typically sold at garden and home centers, and not a homemade concoction that might damage the leaf surface. Read More→

by Will Creed

Over the years a number of ideas have come to be accepted as part of the conventional wisdom of plant care. Some of these ideas started with nursery growers who developed their plant care techniques based on the optimal conditions that they can create in their greenhouses and nurseries. Unfortunately, some of these practices are inappropriate for houseplant owners growing plants in more trying circumstances. No wonder so many people believe they just don’t have green thumbs.

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May
25

Tips on Urban Gardening

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This is the best article on urban gardening that I have seen on urban gardening.  It was written by Marie Iannotti, an about.com guide.

Just because you live in a city doesn’t mean you don’t love and long for plants. Not everyone can have a full blown garden, but with some creativity, you can bring the garden to the city. Whatever size space you are working with, the following urban gardening ideas can put your green thumb to work.

Blooming City Window BoxPhoto: ©Marie Iannotti
1. Are you ready for an urban garden?

There’s nothing unusual about urban gardening – gardeners will find a spot to plant some seeds just about anywhere and city dwellers are some of the most creative. However there are some considerations that urban gardeners have to take into account, like hauling water and radient heat from so much concrete. Here’s a look at questions, concerns and challenges facing the urban gardener. Read More→

Growing Expectations, Inc. PO Box 268 Princeton, NJ 08542 Telephone – (609) 924 – 9782 FAX (609) 737 – 2344